Gossip Girl Goes Quiet

Golden Asters, by Margot Suydan

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 585
Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, it’s to write a ”gossip” poem
.

Words are moments to share
in the world of remote work
meeting faces across screen
muted voices until they speak

Once I had a fine-tuned ear
to gossip, let the tangy talk
bring pleasure to my sour
mouth, in giggle or guffaw

What if chatter met silence
maybe passing on the street
maybe waving a hand in hello
turning up smiling eyes to see

Skinny for You

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 579
Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, it’s to write a ”with you” poem
.

With you
there is
no history
to recall
or forget
just now
seated by
the ebbing
and flow
of tea
like sea.
Eyes up
the horizon
still blue
a chorus
of sunset
color yet
to spread
its chant
we bask
in the calm
and follow
the sun
to its final
demise.

Where I Travel in My Mind

Boston Sunset by Margot Suydam

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 578
Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, it’s to write a” travel” poem
.

Back to where
the fire glows
a rasping blue
orange flame

embers of memory
still burn my feet
when I travel there
move in too close

smoke can make
me cry yet again
watery eyes still
unable to cool all

such heated thoughts
or soften the hard
wood found lodging
in the tent of my heart

So I trip into the light
of a full moon on deck
make my way to a ridge
to sit in its gleaming path

Another Summer Day

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 577
Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, it’s to write a” slow down” poem
.

The sun blazes, the air is thick.
I have no choice but to go slow
muddle through yet another day
of August heat. I yearn to race

North where the cooler days balm
ancient barns, well shaded by pine
maybe oak. Still forests run deep
down to the sea, aglow with scent

mixed with a salty breeze that flies
back, draws me closer to the sand.
Here, I can find calm, sitting down
on the edge of my shadow, not in

the sun. So I retreat to the coolness
of my brick house, rest in shady rooms
tepid mix of musty and not quite frigid
and breath in the fresh air of memory.

Back to Back

Wild Flowers on the Charles by Margot Suydam

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 576
Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, it’s to write a” back to blank” poem
.

We are cousins
resting
on each other
now
our parents
dear sisters and brothers
have all taken
the path
of all ancestors.
Still we caress dirt
drop it
again and again
burying ashes
a final memory
a silent good bye.

A bird whistles
in the memorial
garden, chimes
with the bells
and we watch
our goslings
emerge in a pack.
Back to back
with us, they are
cousins as well.
And so, all will
go on.

Safety is All Relative

Rainy Day in Boston Garden by Margot Suydam

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 575
Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, it’s to write a safe poem
.

The bang of a dish pan
when Summer thunder
rattled the walls brought us
closer even if under loose

blankets. Through the heat
scorched days, we waited
impatiently for rain. Still all
the night racket frightened

us. Between cooling off baths
and unsettled heavy sleep
we criss-crossed the house
to find our parents’ room

in search of safe harbor.
Even as the moat around
us ran full, we always let down
the draw bridge just for now.

The Belief of Old Friends

turkey friends
Photo by Margot Suydam, Turkeys in Brookline

Poem a day #27 is a response to prompts from NaPoWriMo and Write Better Poetry:
1) Write a poem inspired by an entry from the Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows (I chose the word lilo, which means a friendship that can lie dormant for years only to pick right back up instantly, as if no time had passed since you last saw each other), and (2) write a “believe and/or don’t believe” poem.

I don’t believe
we were ever true
friends
certainly
we mouthed
the word list
for forever
but when
you were gone
we were gone
like a leech
ripped from a calf
after wading
through the old
fashion
water works
puncturing thin skin
clearing out clots
in my bleeding
yet still
blood sucking dry
so I had to let go
so lie low without you
so I believe

A Giraffe of A Question

Poem a day #24 is a response to prompts from NaPoWriMo and Write Better Poetry: 1) Find a factual article about an animal, and go back through the text and replace the name of the animal with something else (abstract or concrete), and (2) write a “question” poem. I chose a National Geographic article on giraffes.

Fascinating questions roam in small groups or packs.
Today’s tallest can thank their towering legs, long
necks. Taller than human, they run fast over short

distances, can cruise long distances, comfortably.
Bulls battle one another by butting heads. Contests
usually end when one submits and walks away.

Females give birth standing up so the young endure
a rude welcome into the world, dropping to the ground
at birth. Yet, infants soon stand and run after birth.

Questions must travel miles to keep fed, consuming
hundreds of pounds every week. They apply height
to good advantage, browsing places few can reach.

Long tongues help them pluck tasty morsels.
Like a cow, questions regurgitate, chewing cud.
Height also helps in looking out for predators.

Yet, stature can be a disadvantage, make it dangerous
to drink at a watering hole. Bending over in awkward
positions leaves anyone vulnerable to predators.

Inspire Me

Celebrating National Poetry Month: A Poem-a-Day Challenge

Poem a day #21 is a response to prompts from NaPoWriMo and Write Better Poetry:
1) Write a poem that uses lines that have a repetitive set-up, and (2) write a “blank me” poem.

There’s nothing like a meandering walk in spring time.
A touch of rain falling on my shoulders feels just fine.
There’s nothing like feeling fine drops massage me.
A touch of massage from head to toe sets me free.
There’s nothing like holding freedom in my heart.
A touch of heart resting on my tongue sets a spark.
There’s nothing like the spark of a churchyard bell.
A touch of bell chime spreads in the wind like a yell.
There’s nothing like the yell freedom fighters don.
A touch of radiant light does us good if turned on.

Masking Love

Celebrating National Poetry Month: A Poem-a-Day Challenge

Poem a day #20 is a response to prompts from NaPoWriMo and Write Better Poetry:
1) Write a sijo, a traditional Korean poetic form, and (2) write a “love” or “anti-love” poem.


We stay, lovers too familiar. Our days spent in cramped isolation.
Our mouth covers pulled tight keep us safely masked in conversation.
Still we splurge on laughing smiles, crinkled eyes that show elation.